Skinny Bitches

Toni has been trying to convince me to read Skinny Bitch for over two years now. I still remember when she first read it. It was as if she had some sort of awakening and religious experience. Suddenly every conversation about food began with “Skinny Bitch says,” and she became a card-carrying member of to the vegatarian/organic/meateaters suck club.  She swears that this book changed her life, and it’s pretty much her food bible. I would agree. If you haven’t read it, Skinny Bitch is a book about food and eating choices that essentially make you fat. The authors are a former model and a modeling agent, so the skinny bitch name is more than fitting. Their website says that they tell the truth about diets and “they'll guide you on making intelligent and educated decisions about food. They may be bitches, but they are skinny bitches. And you'll be one too-after you get with the program and start eating right.” Although I haven’t read the entire book - just skimmed over it a few times in the bookstore, I must say that both Toni and I are SKINNY BITCHES! Well, more like black skinny bitches, but skinny bitches nonetheless. I only use black because I think that there is a real difference between how white women and black women define skinny and view our bodies. Plus, if I were white, I wouldn’t actually be described as skinny. According to Chris’ white friends, I’m a “thick” girl. Anyways, I digress that’s another post for another day. Toni and I are skinny bitches because we have a rather harsh real outlook on weight, diet and body image. Although our views don’t always align with other black women, I like to think that we provide a fresh perspective on healthy living that is still unique to our culture. Here are the three core reasons why we are Skinny and Bitches. 1. Food Snobbery – Toni and I are both food snobs. I’m really bad, probably worse than Toni. I turn up my nose at the slightest thought of eating McDonald’s or most fast food in general. My family probably thinks I act “brand new” when I go home, because I refuse to eat vegetables cooked in fat back, pork fat or any of that garbage. I don’t fry foods, and I try to limit my processed food intake. Like the original Skinny Bitches, I try to make a healthy version of the foods I love. Typically the bitch in me comes out when I have to eat other people’s cooking or when other people comment on the food I eat. Sometimes I want to scream, “Stop trying to push your unhealthy, greasy, sugar-laden, fat-back cooking, non-olive oil using, healthy food doesn't taste good, warped food perspective on me...and go for a run!” 2. Size Conscious - I think my view of dress sizes is more bitchy than skinny. I never have and never will feel that women should have to be a size 2, perfect size 6 or even a size 10. Everyone is built differently and can be healthy at different sizes. However, when someone makes a case that a woman is a healthy size 16 or 18, I’m thinking, “Bitch please!” I’m 5’2”, and I was borderline overweight when I started growing out of my size 10 jeans. Not to mention my BMI. The harsh reality was that I was healthier at a size 8; I was more comfortable in my skin, had more energy and I liked the way I looked in my clothes. Plus I’m short! When I wore a size 8, I weighed under 140lbs. At a size 10-12 I was pushing 150. That was too much for my frame. 3. Tough love – The reviews on the Skinny Bitch website describe their advice as no-holds-barred and hard hitting. I wouldn't describe myself that way. Toni "you put on some major pounds" Marshall is a little more forthcoming with the tough love. She’s honest with people, and I respect that. I merely drop hints like, “maybe you should eat a salad.” After reading an article that encouraged women to tell their friends they need to lose weight, I posted a question on twitter asking people if and how they told their friends they needed to drop a few pounds. Not surprisingly, most people didn't have the guts to say anything or they didn't know a tactful way to break the news. I've been on the receiving end of the "you need to lose weight" conversation, and I know that it hurts to hear it. Especially since it was my mother who was telling me and she isn't always gentle with her advice. Her words were real, and looking back I appreciate the tough love. Maybe more black women need to stage weight interventions? Just an idea… Are you a skinny bitch? How many of y’all have read the book? Are Toni and I too bitchy?  We want to know your thoughts.


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